(703) 369-4738

30
Mar
2020

Virtual Meetings and Consultations Now Available

In efforts to continue to serve our clients in a safe and CDC compliant manner, we are now offering virtual meetings and consultations.

If you are interested in scheduling a virtual consultation or meeting with your attorney, please call 703-369-4738 and one of our legal assistants will schedule a zoom appointment.

23
Mar
2020

Resources to Help Employers Respond to Workplace Issues From COVID-19 (Corona Virus)

By: Kristina Keech Spitler, Esquire

FOR THE MOST UP TO DATE INFO, PLEASE VISIT OUR COVID-19 PAGE

DOWNLOAD REPORT FOR PRINT

Given the fast-paced and changing nature of the impacts of the COVID-19 (Corona Virus) pandemic, businesses are working to respond in the best manner possible for the safety of their employees and customers while remaining in compliance with various employment laws and evaluating their ability to keep their businesses viable. On the evening of March 18, 2020, President Trump signed Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) which amongst other provisions, includes the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act, the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act, and the Tax Credits For Paid Sick and Paid Family and Medical Leave that generally apply to all employers with fewer than 500 employees.

Businesses are evaluating how to respond to this pandemic which includes dealing with the following challenges (to name just a few of the many issues and concerns):

  1. Determine how to keep their employees safe and comply with various federal, state and local mandates, laws, and guidance.
  2. Determine how to comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Act.
  3. Evaluate if they can continue business operations by allowing employees to work remotely, and if so, which employees can work remotely. Ensuring that employees have the technology in place to effectively work remotely, and determine what policies and practices need to be put in place or amended.
  4. Determine what leave they should or must offer to their employees and whether they need to amend their existing leave and vacation policies and practices. Determine how to continue to comply with existing Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) requirements (generally applicable to employers with 50 or more employees) and now comply with the new Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act and Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act requirements pursuant to the FFCRA.
  5. Determine how to comply with laws that prohibit discrimination based upon disability.
  6. Determine how to correctly pay employees (exempt and nonexempt) under the Fair Labor Standards Act given all the variables in play.
  7. Evaluate whether they should just close down and conserve resources with the hope of being able to reopen in the future.
  8. Evaluate what unemployment benefits can employees who have been terminated, laid off, or furloughed may be eligible for through the Virginia Employment Commission.

To help businesses with these challenges, I have provided some helpful information, a summary of some applicable employment laws, and identified where you can find additional useful resources.

Please note that this summary is designed to provide general information, is not intended to constitute legal advice, and should not be utilized as a substitute for professional services in specific situations. If legal advice or other expert assistance is required, please consult with an attorney.

Employers have a number of issues to consider in this difficult time. If you need legal counsel, please feel free to contact me at 703 369 4738 or kspitler@vfnlaw.com. In addition, please stay safe and healthy.

Employee and Customer Safety

Employers should frequently review the website for the Center for Disease Control (CDC) regarding guidance and regular updates including its Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/guidance-business-response.html

Employers should also frequently visit the website for the Virginia Department of Health. http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus/

Occupational Safety and Health Act (“OSHA”)

“The Occupational Safety and Health Act requires employers to comply with safety and health standards and regulations promulgated by OSHA or by a state with an OSHA-approved state plan. In addition, the Act’s General Duty Clause, Section 5(a)(1), requires employers to provide their employees with a workplace free from recognized hazards likely to cause death or serious physical harm.” This statement is contained in OSHA’s Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19. Employers should review this resource at the website referenced below. https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3990.pdf

Remote Working/Telecommuting

While working remotely (also called telecommuting or teleworking) is not new and many employers (both small and large) have been allowing employees to do so and/or providing it as a benefit to employees for flexibility and work/life benefit reasons, the COVID-19 pandemic is forcing all employers to consider this as an option for business continuity reasons. If you already allow remote working, you should review and if necessary, amend existing policies – particularly if you previously only allowed remote working for limited periods such as one day per week. If you are new to teleworking or who have previously been reluctant to allow it, there are many resources available on the internet that can help you manage teleworking employees. Below is a site for an article from Harvard Business Review on how to manage newly remote workers. https://hbr.org/2020/03/a-guide-to-managing-your-newly-remote-workers

Employee Leave

Employee leave is not a simple issue and involves various laws (and now including the newly enacted Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act and Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act as part of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act). Employers should consult with legal counsel to ensure compliance with leave laws.

Generally, employers will need to comply with their current policies or amend them regarding any paid or unpaid leave to provide employees. Employers should also look at their vacation policies. Employers will need to decide if they are going to allow employees to take advance leave/vacation and/or go into the negative if employees need to take leave related to the Corona virus or other illnesses. Employers may need to amend various policies to address these issues. In addition, please see the FFCRA summary below as the Act requires paid sick leave related to the Corona virus under certain conditions for all employers with fewer than 500 employees.

Employers will also need to comply with existing FMLA laws and regulations. Generally, the FMLA applies to employers with 50 or more employees within a 75-mile radius and would not apply to smaller employers. However, please see the FFCRA summary below as the Act amends the FMLA to deal with the Corona virus and applies to all employers with fewer than 500 employees.

For convenience, I have included the website below for Department of Labor’s “COVID19 or Other Public Health Emergencies and the Family and Medical Leave Act Questions and Answers” which was published prior to the enactment of FFCRA. https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/fmla/pandemic

Leave Under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)

The FFCRA was enacted quickly in response to the Corona virus and, in part, requires all private for-profit and not-for-profit employers with fewer than 500 employees along with government employers (“Covered Employers”) to provide certain paid sick leave and paid family and medical leave to employees. It also provides that these employers will get a tax credit as described below. There are a lot of unanswered questions about this new legislation. As of the date of this article, DOL has not published any regulations or guidance on compliance with FFCRA. Stay tuned as guidance is expected. Both the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act and the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act provide that they “shall take effect not later than 15 days after the date of the enactment of this Act.” As part of FFCRA, it was signed by President Trump on March 18, 2020 so that it would go into effect under the Act by April 2, 2020 at the latest. Both acts end on December 31, 2020.

FFCRA Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act

Covered Employers shall provide employees for immediate use (regardless of how long they have been employed) with up to 10 days of paid sick leave if the employee is unable to work or telework for the following reasons:

  1. The employee is subject to a Federal, State, or local quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19;
  2. The employee has been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19;
  3. The employee is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and seeking a medical diagnosis.
  4. The employee is caring for an individual who is subject to a quarantine or isolation order as described in (1) above, or has been advised as described in (2) above;
  5. The employee is caring for a son or daughter whose school or place of care has been closed, or the childcare provider is unavailable, due to COVID-19 precautions; or
  6. The employee is experiencing any other substantially similar condition specified by the Secretary of Health and Human Services in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of Labor.

The amount of hours of paid sick time for full-time employees is up to 10 days (80 hours). Part time employees are entitled to “a number of hours equal to the number of hours that such employee works, on average, over a 2-week period.” Unused paid sick leave may not be carried over from one year to the next.

The amount Covered Employers must pay to an employee who is unable to work or telework for one of the above reasons will be the following:

  • paid at the employee’s regular rate, up to $511 per day ($5,110 in the aggregate), to quarantine or seek a diagnosis or preventive care for COVID-19 (reasons 1, 2 or 3 above); or
  • paid at two-thirds the employee’s regular rate, up to $200 per day ($2,000 in the aggregate), to care for a family member for such purposes or to care for a child whose school has closed, or whose child care provider is unavailable, due to COVID-19, or the employee is experiencing any other substantially similar condition specified by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (reasons 4, 5 and 6 above).

Covered Employers may not require an employee to use other paid leave provided by the employer before the employee uses the paid sick leave provided under this Act. The Act does not address how to handle if the employer has already provided sick or other type of leave to employees prior to its enactment.

It shall be unlawful for employers to discharge, discipline, or in any other manner discriminate against any employee who takes leave under this Act and who has filed any complaint related to this Act or has or will testify about any such proceeding. Violations of this Act will be considered violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act and employees may be entitled to unpaid wages, liquidated damages, and attorneys’ fees and costs.

Covered Employers are required to post and keep posted in conspicuous places on their premises a notice regarding the rights under this Act. This notice will be prepared by the Secretary of Labor and available at a later date. Secretary of Labor shall make a publicly available model notice within 7 days of enactment.

Covered Employers of health care providers or emergency responders may elect to exclude such employees from the application of this subsection.

In addition, the Secretary of Labor shall have the authority to issue regulations to: 1) exclude certain health care providers and emergency responders from the definition of employee, including allowing employers of such health care providers and emergency responders to opt out; 2) to exempt small businesses with fewer than 50 employees from the requirements of providing paid sick leave under reason #5 above (the employee is caring for a son or daughter whose school or place of care has been closed, or the childcare provider is unavailable, due to COVID-19 precautions) when the imposition of such requirements would jeopardize the viability of the business as a going concern; and 3) as necessary to carry out the purposes of this Act.

FFCRA Emergency Family and Medical Leave Act

This Act amends the existing Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993. The Act provides that Employees who have been employed for at least 30 days with a Covered Employer will be entitled to take up to 12 weeks of job-protected Emergency FMLA leave for a qualifying need related to a public health emergency of COVID-19. The Act defines this to mean that the employee is unable to work or telework in order to care for a child (under the age of 18) if the child’s school or place of care has been closed or the childcare provider is unavailable due to COVID-19. The first two weeks of the Emergency FMLA leave are unpaid under this Act. During this time, Employee sick leave may be under the Emergency Paid Sick Leave described above or the employee may elect, but may not be required, to substitute any accrued vacation leave, personal leave, or medical or sick leave already provided by the employer. Thereafter, the remaining 10 weeks would be paid Emergency FMLA leave. The amount of pay shall be no less that two-thirds (2/3) of the employee’s usual pay, up to $200 per day ($10,000 total). When the need for such leave is foreseeable, employee shall provide the employer with such notice as is practicable.

It is unclear at this time whether or how employer-provided paid leave would run concurrently with this Emergency FMLA leave and how it would interact with the traditional FMLA leave benefits.

As this is job-protected leave, this means that the employer must restore the employee to the same or equivalent position when s/he returns to work from such leave. However, for Covered Employers who employ fewer than 25 employees, the Act provides that this job restoration provision shall not apply if 1) the position does not exist due to economic conditions or other changes in operating conditions of the employer that affect employment and are caused by a public health emergency during the period of leave; and 2) the employer makes reasonable efforts to restore the employee to an equivalent position during the year following the conclusion of the leave period.

Similar to the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act, Covered Employers of health care providers or emergency responders may elect to exclude such employees from the application of this subsection. In addition, the Secretary of Labor shall have the authority to issue regulations to 1) exclude certain health care providers and emergency responders from the definition of employee; and 2) to exempt small businesses with fewer than 50 employees when the imposition of such requirements would jeopardize the viability of the business as a going concern.

FFCRA Tax Credits for Employers Providing Emergency Paid Sick Leave and Emergency FMLA Leave

Covered Employers who provide Emergency Paid Sick Leave and Emergency FMLA Leave will be eligible for refundable tax credits on their payroll tax payments equal to 100% of the amount paid (up to the maximum amount authorized by each Act) during each quarter.

Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”)

For employers who are covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (15 or more employees), the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) has provided guidance on complying with the ADA and Rehabilitation Act, including requirements for reasonable accommodations and rules about medical examinations and inquiries. On March 19, 2020, the EEOC clarified that while both Acts continue to apply, they do not interfere with or prevent employers from following the guidelines and suggestions by the CDC or state/local public health authorities. See the EEOC’s webpage and the EEOC’s Pandemic Preparedness in the Workplace and the Americans With Disabilities Act below. https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/newsroom/wysk/wysk_ada_rehabilitaion_act_coronavirus.cfm https://www.eeoc.gov/facts/pandemic_flu.html

Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”)

Employers need to be careful to ensure that they are complying with the FLSA when evaluating how to correctly pay their employees (exempt and nonexempt) given all the variables in play during this pandemic. Employers should consult with legal counsel to ensure they are complying with the FLSA. In addition, please see the guidance that the Department of Labor has provided: “COVID-19 or Other Public Health Emergencies and the Fair Labor Standards Act Questions and Answers.” https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/flsa/pandemic

Closing Your Business, Terminating Employees, and Unemployment Benefits

Evaluating whether a business should close down now and conserve resources with the hope of being able to reopen in the future is a complicated and difficult decision. The decisions regarding whether to terminate, layoff or furlough some or all employees is equally as difficult. Both issues are beyond the scope of this article. In the event that employers do terminate employees and/or significantly reduce their hours, generally the employees may apply for unemployment benefits with the Virginia Employment Commission. Note that beginning March 15, 2020, the one week waiting period and the requirement to conduct a weekly job search has been suspended by the Governor in response to the pandemic. See the Virginia Employment Commission website below. http://www.vec.virginia.gov/

Businesses should also be aware of the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (“WARN Act”) which generally requires that employers with 100 or more employees provide certain notices of intention when closing a facility with 50 or more employees and/or laying off 50 or more employees. The Virginia VEC has established a rapid response team to help in this situation. See VEC website above.

3
Jan
2020

When is the last time you updated your employee handbook?

Join us for a free upcoming seminar: Employee Handbooks. Will Yours Make the Grade?

February 13th, 2020

  • Time: 8:30 am –10:00 am
  • Location: Paul Davis training room- 44601 Guilford Dr, Ashburn, VA 20147

Join Vanderpool, Frostick & Nishanian, P.C.’s employment law attorneys Kris Spitler and Brendan Cassidy for a presentation on how to create an effective and compliant employee handbook.

Whether you are creating a brand new handbook or revising your current handbook, spending the time to properly craft the policies in your employee handbook can help ensure that they fit your Company’s business needs, do not expose it to liability, and provide employers with defenses against common charges brought by employees.

To reserve your space, please complete the form below:

Employee Handbook Seminar
17
Dec
2019

Six Attorneys Named Legal Elite in 2019

Vanderpool, Frostick & Nishanian, P.C. is proud to announce that six of its attorneys have been recognized by the Virginia Business Magazine as being among Virginia’s “Legal Elite” within their various practice categories. All of the attorneys named have been nominated as Legal Elite in the past and we’re extremely honored to celebrate their continued success and exceptional work!

Litigation & Construction– Randolph Frostick

Land Use & Real Estate– Michael Vanderpool

Intellectual Property– Christopher Collins

Employment Law– Kristina Keech Spitler

Young Lawyer (under 40) – Brett Callahan

Business Law– V. Rick Nishanian

17
Oct
2019

Avoiding Litigation: Free Seminar

Wednesday, Oct. 23rd
6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Centerfuse in Manassas

Join VF&N’s litigation attorney Brett Callahan as she presents at the Oct. YPNOVA Success Series Seminar: Avoiding Litigation.

Ms. Callahan will cover common mistakes businesses make that can lead to or increase the risk of litigation related to contracts, real estate, employment, intellectual property, business formation, and compliance.

Open to the public, YPNOVA membership not required.

25
Sep
2019

Four VF&N attorneys rated AV Preeminent®

Congratulations to our team of AV Preeminent® attorneys Randolph Frostick, Olaun Simmons, Michael Vanderpool & Kristina Keech Spitler! AV Preeminent® is Martindale-Hubbell’s highest professional achievement, a designation trusted worldwide by buyers and referrers of legal services.

The process of Martindale-Hubbell® Peer Review Ratings™ has been the gold standard in the rating of attorneys’ legal ability and high ethical standards for more than 100 years. One of the reasons this award is such an honor is that it is only bestowed on a select few, about 10% of all attorneys. Because of this, it is a designation that can be trusted by clients and those who need to refer clients for other legal services.

For more info visit: https://www.martindale.com/ratings

16
Jul
2019

Eighth Annual Employment Law and HR Summit

 

Eighth Annual Employment Law and HR Summit
Vision 2020: The Future of HR

 

Friday, October 11, 2019 – 8:00am-5:00pm

Foxchase Manor: 8310 Chatsworth Drive, Manassas, Virginia 20109

 

REGISTER HERE 

 

As a human resource professional, business owner, executive, manager or administrative personnel tasked with dealing with HR issues, you need to stay on top of recent developments in the field of HR and employment law that may impact the future of your business. This Summit is designed to provide you with critical information in an engaging and useful format. Being informed about what is going on in the world of employment will help you stay on top of your company’s evolving HR needs.

The Employment Law & HR Summit is an easy and affordable way to summarize and highlight the most up-to-date information employers need to address issues currently impacting their workforce and organization, and identify issues that can have an impact on tomorrow’s workplace.

Jointly Presented by Vanderpool, Frostick & Nishanian, P.C., and Prince William SHRM, Inc.

Speakers & Topics

Kristina Keech Spitler, Esq.- Vanderpool, Frostick & NishanianHottest employment law issues and trends of 2019 as well as significant court decisions.
Christopher D. Silva – Assistant District Director US Department of Labor/Wage & Hour DivisionLearn important information from the DOL on topics including FLSA exemptions, wage deductions, independent contractor classifications, overtime requirements, and minimum wage issues. This is also the opportunity for attendees to gain a clearer perspective about common employer violations and trends in DOL enforcement.
Jinnae Monroe – Managing Principal, Professionals by DesignGain a deeper richer understanding of generations in the workplace and best practices for accepting roles and responsibilities of each generation. The session will discuss the importance of HR’s role in leading and guiding other organizational units in embracing generational differences.
Mauricio Velasquez – CEO & Owner The Diversity Training GroupThe HR professional in 2020 must understand the concepts of Change Management and have the skills and knowledge to guide their organizations through change. This session will address how HR professionals can help their organizations identify the impact of change, assess and manage the ripple effects that change can cause across the organization, and how to communicate change across throughout all levels of the organization.

PricingIncludes admission, continental breakfast, lunch, written materials (online), and a chance to win prizes!!!

Early Bird Rate on or before August 31st: PWSHRM Member Rate: $129, Non-Member Rate: $169.

Regular Rate on or after September 1st: PWSHRM Member Rate: $169, Non-Member Rate: $199.

Cancellation Fee $25. No refunds will be issued after September 12, 2019. Registration closes October 3, 2019.

Credit Status: One-Day Conference is approved for 5 HRCI ( 3.75 Business/1.25 General ) & 5 SHRM PD Hours

22
May
2019

Client awarded large Australian government contract

In a press release by the Australian Minister for Defence; issued March 06, 2019 it was announced that “the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) will receive a new sovereign air transportable Submarine Rescue Service capability under a contract with Phoenix International (Australia).”

Attorney Christopher Collins speaks to the proposal efforts, the due diligence performed to vet subcontractors and the importance of solid teaming agreements.

15
May
2019

How to Protect Your Business When Ice Agents Want To Inspect Your I-9 Forms

ICE Agents have been active recently in the Prince William area and other parts of the VA/DC/MD metropolitan area, investigating businesses (especially small and medium companies) to determine compliance with properly completing and retaining I-9 forms.  Employers in industries involving construction, restaurants, landscaping, and janitorial/cleaning services are frequently (but by no means the only) targets of ICE investigations. 

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) (an agency within the Department of Homeland Security) has significantly increased its efforts to reduce unlawful immigration employment practices under the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA). Employers are legally required to verify the identity of the person they hire and to confirm that they are eligible to work in the United States.  The law further requires that employers document this process by completing a Form I-9 for each person they hire.

ICE has focused enforcement efforts on employers who hire an illegal workforce. They follow up on tips provided by the public and conduct random and unannounced audits of employer records to determine if the company has complied with its legal obligations.  They do not need probable cause to investigate your business nor do they need to have a tip.  

I-9 Forms and ICE’s Notice of Inspection

The mandatory I-9 forms must be completed every time you make a new hire.  The form must be retained for three years after the date of hire, or one year after the date employment ends, whichever is later. If ICE has been given a tip or the business has been selected for an audit, ICE will present you with a Notice of Inspection.  

What to Expect from an ICE Inspection

The notice of inspection usually requests the following records from the company:

  • I-9 records
  • Payroll records
  • 1099s
  • No-match and mismatch letters

Upon notice, you have three business days to provide the investigating officers with the requested documents.

Civil and Criminal Penalties

Failure of employers to comply with IRCA can result in substantial civil fines and ultimately, possible criminal prosecution if you are found to have knowingly violated the law. 

What To Do If ICE Agents Present You With A Notice of Inspection Regarding Your I-9s

  • Do not provide records immediately or allow an immediate inspection of records as you have up to three days to respond.
  • Call your trusted employment lawyer in order to advise you on the best course of action and to timely respond with the proper documents presented in the best light possible.

Ensuring Compliance Before ICE Investigates

If you have not yet been the subject of an investigation, you can take steps to protect your business.  Employers should conduct confidential internal audits of your I-9 forms with the help of your employment lawyer.  This process can help you correct any potential problems before an inspection and avoid possible fines.  It is also beneficial to have knowledgeable employment counsel conduct periodic training of your personnel assigned to handle your I-9s.

Contact a Trusted Employment Law Attorney

Kristina Keech Spitler, Esq., with Vanderpool, Frostick & Nishanian is ready to help your business respond to an ICE inspection, provide a confidential internal Form I-9 audit, and/or help train your personnel to properly complete and retain I-9 forms.


Kristina Keech Spitler is a Shareholder and Head of the Employment Law Practice of Vanderpool, Frostick & Nishanian, PC.  With over thirty years of experience, Kris has been recognized as “Legal Elite” in Employment Law by Virginia Business Magazine, as well as a “Leader in the Law” and an “Influential Women of Law” by Virginia Lawyers Weekly.  You can reach Kris at (703)369-4738 or kspitler@vfnlaw.com.

** The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. 

12
Dec
2018

General Contractors Beware of New Maryland Law

by Guy R. Jeffress, Esq.

The Maryland General Assembly passed Senate Bill 853, which took effect on October 1, 2018, that added the following text to Section 3-507.2 of the Maryland Code, Labor & Employment:

In an action brought under subsection (a) of this section, a general contractor on a project for construction services is jointly and severally liable for a violation of this subtitle that is committed by a subcontractor, regardless of whether the subcontractor is in a direct contractual relationship with the general contractor.

If a court finds that a sub-contractor failed, under certain circumstances, to properly pay an employee, the general contractor may be liable for damages, counsel fees, and other costs.

The Act now permits an employee of a sub-contractor, who was not paid in accordance with applicable Maryland wage/hour laws, the right of action against the general contractor even though there is no direct contractual relationship between the general contractor and the subcontractor’s employee.

Risk mitigation strategies for Owners, General Contractors and Senior Sub-Contractors involved in Maryland based construction projects:

  1. Inspection of Payroll Records – Include in your contracts a provision that requires subcontractors to provide certified and detailed payroll information with every pay application.
  2. Audit Clauses – Include provisions in your contracts that permits you to conduct “spot audits” or “interviews” with sub-contractor employees.
  3. Certifications – Require sub-contractors to certify or declare in their payment applications that they have checked/audited the payrolls of every sub-contractor at every tier to confirm the payment of employees.
  4. Insurance/Bonding – Require subcontractors to furnish payment and/or performance bonds or wage-hour insurance. To cover the entire statutory period for wage claims, these bonds or insurance will have to be maintained for three years after final payment of wages on the project.
  5. Broad Indemnity and Personal Guaranty Provisions – In addition to any existing general indemnification clause, include a specific clause or language addressing claims arising out of any violations of the Act. Require that the principals of all sub-contractors personally guaranty compliance with the Act and payment of employees.
  6. Flow Down of Terms and Conditions – Require that all clauses in the sub-contract relating to the Act and subcontractor’s obligations thereunder flow down to each subcontract tier.
  7. Obligation to Defend – In addition to indemnification obligations there should also be provisions all sub-contracts requiring the sub-contractor to defend the general/direct contractor for violations of the Act.
  8. Hiring Decisions – Include provisions giving the general contractor the power to approve or reject the hiring of sub-subcontractors of all tiers.
  9. Site Security – Implement site security to confirm identification of all employees on the job site so no previously unidentified individuals can later appear seemingly out of nowhere and claim that an employer/subcontractor did not pay them.
  10. Creation of Fiduciary Duty – “In-Trust” Requirements – Include a provision in all private works sub-contracts requiring sub-contractors to hold all payments received “in trust” for the benefit of the direct contractor and the benefit of the subcontractor’s employees, lower-tiered subcontractor employees, for the purpose of meeting the wage and benefit obligations owed not only to the subcontractor’s employees but the employees of any lower-tiered subcontractors.
  11. Increased Retention – Increase retention percentages, withholding, and back-charges depending on the sub-contractor and size of job.
  12. Identification of General Contractor – expressly note the identity of the general contractor in each contract. Project owners may want to include disclaimers that they are “not” acting as the general contractor.
  13. Three Years Statute of Limitations – A general contractor should retain pertinent records from all subcontractors for at least that long following project completion and should make sure that all indemnification obligations survive the completion of the project for that length of time as well.

Please contact us at 703-369-4738 with any questions.

*The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. The material on this website may not reflect the most current legal developments. The content and interpretation of the law addressed herein is subject to revision. We disclaim all liability in respect to actions taken or not taken based on any or all the contents of this site. Do not act or refrain from acting upon this information without seeking professional legal counsel.